Claire’s Guide To Northern Irish

Following my last post I thought it would be a good idea to post a guide to some local slang and phrases to help you all to learn to speak Northern Irish. It really is a language of it’s own.

 

  • Norn Iron – Northern Ireland
  •  eejit – a silly person
  • wane – a child
  • wee – small
  • boney – bonfire
  • youse – you plural
  • aye – yes
  • bake – someones face
  • thon – that
  • yoke – a person, as in ‘thon yoke’
  • mucker – friend
  • bout ye? – how are you?
  • here’s me – I said, as in ‘and here’s me to him – you’re an eejit’
  • The Brough – unemployment benefit – pronounced ‘brew’
  • bap – your head – can also mean a soft bread roll
  • slabbering – talking badly of someone as in ‘You slabbering?’ usually asking in an intimidating way
  • bate – beat, as in, to hit
  • caul – cold, pronounced ‘cowl’
  • haul on – hold on – pronounced ‘howl’
  • baltic – cold
  • ignerent – rude. eg. she’s an ignerent aul doll – she’s a rude old lady.
  • wick – useless
  • saunter – walking, usually used in anger or annoyance ‘saunter on’
  • jog on – go away
  • happ up – dress warmly eg. ‘make sure you happ up before you go outside.’
  • here’s me – and I said eg. ‘and here’s me, you’re an eejt.’
  • stroked – stolen
  • melted – annoyed, as in ‘that we lad has me melted’ – ‘that young boy has annoyed me.’
  • stuck – as in ‘I stuck my da for it’ means ‘I got my dad to buy it for me’
  • da – father
  • ma – mother
  • cuddy – young boy – rural
  • cully – young girl – rural
  • kecks – underwear
  • munter – unattractive person
  • lamped – hit/punched
  • lamps – eyes
  • bay – boy, as in ‘hey boy’ – rural greating
  • scundered – embarassed
  • guddies – trainers
  • grand – good eg. ‘That’s grand.’
  • poke – an icecream cone
  • pokey – ice cream van
  • peelers – police officers
  • press – kitchen cupboard as in ‘the beans are in the press’ – rural
  • do your knees – threatening to break someone’s kneecaps
  • I’ll do you – similar to the above but not specific to kneecaps
  • ragin’ – angry
  • runner – as in ‘doing a runner’ – running away from someone or something. Usually police.
  • till – to, as in ‘are you coming till the pub’
  • right – used as an assertive at the start of a sentence, eg. ‘right, I’m off home.’
  • tae – tea, cup of
  • tea – dinner
  • skitter – brat
  • dead on – alright
  • sound – alright/dead on’Yer man was sound.’
  • quare – a lot / large/ impressive eg. ‘hat’s a quare sized of car’ or ‘that’s a quare set of boobs’
  • jebs – breasts
  • windee – window
  • boggin – dirty
  • snatters – nasal mucus eg. she had snatters all over her face
  • I’ll put my toe up your hole – I’ll kick you in the bottom
  • tear into – start, eg. I’m about to tear into the ironing
  • doting – used to suggest mental faculties are fading ‘yer ma’s doting’
  • The Tele – pronounced ‘telly’ the Belfast Telegraph – newspaper
  • boke – to vomit
  • boking up your ring – vomiting a lot
  • mere – come here
  • geg – amusing person or situation eg ‘he was a right geg’
  • keep ‘er lit – keep going
  • buck – to have sex with eg. ‘he bucked her’
  • culchie – someone from a rural area – often used as an insult
  • taty bread – dead, pronounced taytee
  • millie – female chav
  • wee buns – easy
  • clabberd in – covered in
  • belter – good eg. that was belter
  • gurnin’ – crying/complaining eg. she was gurning because someone ate her chips
  • so it is – used at the end of a sentence as an assertive eg. ‘the car’s in the drive, so it is.’
  • bai – boy
  • Bucky – Buckfast, a fortifed wine made by monks – tastes like cough syrup
  • jammie – lucky
  • lifted – arrested, as in ‘He got lifted.’
  • offie – the off licence
  • wee doll – young women – usually used as an insult
  • aul doll – old lady
  • aul man – old man
  • spide – a chav
  • fegs – cigarettes
  • catch yourself on – get a hold of yourself
  • is that you? – are you finished/ready?
  • Shankill tracksuit – pyjamas
  • gub – mouth
  • hoke – poke about in/rummage
  • hole – bum – often used in insult eg. ‘Stick it up your hole’ or ‘Get off your hole and do something.’
  • am’t na? – am I not?
  • dur – stupid
  • thran – willful eg. ‘she’s a thran wee cully’
  • while – very, as in ‘while big’
  • big lad – a robust young man, often used in greeting eg ‘Bout ye, big lad?’
  • does my head in – annoys me, eg. ‘That wee cuddy next door does my head in.’

 

Please note, this is not a complete list and if I’ve missed something you think should be here, let me know.

 

C

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